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Wednesday, May 20, 2015

And where would be be without Cliff's Reggae expertise?

Another weekly contributor, of course, is Cliff, reggae-man extraordinaire!.......While I love the
music, my knowledge of it is limited (to say the least) and Cliff has been a Godsend when it comes to delivering classic reggae greatness to the blog. All I can say is THANKS, man, and as long as you have stuff to contribute, I promise you a slot for it!



To credit  this album to Don Carlos and Gold is a bit misleading. Of the dozen tracks on “Ghetto Living” Gold takes lead vocals on only two, he does however provide harmonies to a number of the others. Overall though  “Ghetto Living” is a vehicle for Don Carlos.  The Roots Radics, with their dancehall-friendly beats and melody-driven style are a perfect backdrop for the voice of Carlos which floats perfectly and effortlessly  over their riddims. However on “Plantation” he delivers a number with real passion.  "Come on Over" is stunning , a rub-a-dub offering to the sound systems.
Throughout the album Carlos’ vocals are brilliant buzzing with soul, emotion and conviction. The stand out track for me though is the cover he does of Abysinnians’ “Declaration of Rights” which out performs the original for intenisity

Track List: 1. Never Run Away 2. Declaration of Rights 3. Tear Drops 4. Them say 5. Plantation 6. Ghetto Living 7. Go Find Yourself 8. It Was Love 9. Every Time I See You
10. Come On Over 11. Promise To be True 12. Angel Face Woman


Robin Hood was released when Levy was only 16 years of age and delivers some real class dancehall. It is
probably worth it alone for "Rock And Come In," but there are no fillers on this album. Robin Hood sees a serious, dark side of Barrington Levy pondering about life and love. Backed by the Roots Radics in fine form; as they usually were and produced by Juno Lawes and mixed by Scientist this is an album worthy to be in anybody’s collection.  "Many Changes In Life," is a wonderful dubby tune  whilst "Neh Broke No Fight Over a Woman" has an air of menace about it. Don’t take my word for it, do yourself a favour and pull up a chair, get a drink and smoke of your choice, turn your phone off and give it a listen 

Track List: 1. Robin Hood 2. Rock and Come In 3. Love Sister Carol 4. Gonna Tell Your Girlfriend  5. You Come To Ask Me What Love Is 6. Why Did You leave Me 7. Many Changes In Life 8. Na Broke No Fight Over No Woman 9. When Friday Come 10. Like How You Kiss And Caress Me



This is one of the best reggae compilation albums of all time. It is the soundtrack to the 1980 film Rockers and is up there musically in the same league as “The Harder They Come”. As the title informs it focuses on one area of reggae, the explicitly political and rather stern "rockers" style that came to the forefront in the late 1970s. It is full of great and classic tunes of that era delivered courtesy of some of reggae’s heavyweight acts at that time. If you only want to have just one reggae album that covers a number of the leading artisits (can’t understand why you would though) then you may as well make it this one. 

Track List 1. We 'a' Rockers (Inner Circle)  2. Money Worries (Maytones)  3. Police and Thieves (Junior Murvin) 4. Books of Rules (The Heptones)  5. Stepping Razor (Peter Tosh)  6. Tenement Yard (Jacob Miller)  7. Fade Away (Junior Byles)  8. Rockers (Bunny Wailer)  9. Slave Master (Gregory Isaacs)  10. Dread Lion (The Upsetters) 11. Graduation in Zion (Kiddus I)  12. Jah No Dead (Burning Spears)  13. Satta Amasa-Gana-(Third World)  14. Natty Take Over (Justin Hinds & The Dominoes)

Another mind-blowing post Cliff, especially the great "Rockers" ya like a brother, man, it's great the stuff you have done to help make this blog better, I could never BEGIN to tell you how much I appreciate it!


  1. hi name prep for Cliff s contributions
    - a little bit of Cliff

  2. hi
    here s name proposition for Cliff s contributions
    a little bit of Cliff