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Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Here is the great Cliff's latest submission

Here is the latest submission from the wonderkind that is Cliff, my great and wonderful friend in the UK.......he is my reggae "go to" guy, compared to him I don't know shit about it, but I appreciate the fuck out of the work that he does to help me out, to be honest, he is so fucking great he should start his own reggae blog, but until he does I am THRILLED that he contributes his fine stuff here.......thanks Cliff, love you like a brother, even though I have never met you, which if you think about it, is one of the highest praises I could give you (unless, of course you were a hot babe, then all bets would be off, of course)....
Dread Inna Inglan Pt.2
As I said last week I would post part 2 of bands that emerged in the UK in the late 70’s – early 80’s; so here you are.
MATUMBI – POINT OF VIEW Matumbi were one of the earliest and most influential British reggae bands but also one of the lesser known. They set out to show that that British reggae could sound as good and be as "rootsy" as Jamaican reggae. Driven by the great Dennis Bovell who built himself a formidable reputation as a musician, producer and sound engineer ‘Point of View’ is a wonderful commercial roots reggae album with tinges of pop. However whilst they had a sound that could crossover they remained firmly rooted in the reggae sound of drum and bass that should please everyone. 
 Track List: 1. Point of View (Squeeze a Little Lovin') 2. Come With Me 3. Blue Beat and Ska 4. Things I Do for You 5. Pretender 6. Guide Us 7. Hook Den 8. Black Civilization 9. Music In the Air 10. All Over the World (Money)

I love the sound of this album; it’s as good as introspective reggae gets. Sadly as their career gathered pace they began to turn towards more a soul/funk based sound, which didn’t really do it for me. However not before they turned out 2 or 3 other quality albums. This was their debut album and displayed some wonderful organic roots reggae. Aswad attempted a fusion of Rastafarianism with social issues that affected the Black populatuion in the hostile environment of the UK at the time which helped produced a sound of their own.  "Concrete Slaveship" is hard-hitting social justice number and the instrumental "Ethiopian Rhapsody" is worth the cost of the album alone
Track List: 1.  I A Rebel Soul, 2: Can't Stand The Pressure, 3: Ethiopian Rhapsody, 4: Natural Progression, 5: Back To Africa, 6: Red Up, 7: Ire Woman, 8: Concrete Slaveship

Forming in 1979 Black Roots didn’t release this, their debut album, until 1983; but it was well worth the wait. No nonsense production, potent messages, strong vocals, and exhilarating music made this album a welcome addition to the British Reggae scene. They may not be as well known as Steel Pulse or Aswad but for me they were the equal of them at the very least. Black Roots probably evoked the sound of late 70’s Jamaican reggae more than other British bands but there was no crime in that.  Stand out tracks for me are  ‘Juvenile Delinquent’, with its compulsive rythmn and at the time spot on message, and the repatriation themed ‘Africa’ with its melancholy guitar lead. 
Track List: 1. The Father 2. Survival 3. Juvenile Delinquent 4. What Them A Do 5. Opportunity 6. Tribal War 7. Africa 8. Move On


I didn’t know whether to include any UB40 or not.There is only one word to describe UB40 and that is SHIT!! Over the years they have churned out some of the most insipid, bland reggae it has been the misfortune foranybody to hear. BUT they debuted with an album that makes you think they were a completely different band then. Tracks like ‘Burden of Shame’, ‘Tyler’, ‘King’ and the anti-Thatcher Madam Medusa carried heartfelt political statements set to fine grooves and echoey dubs. Sadly though despite the decent tracks on this album and also ‘Present Arms’ UB40 went on to  turnout album after  album after album of forgettable crapMy advice to you is to listen to this, ‘Present Arms’  and consign 99% of the rest of the stuff they inflicted upon us to the trash.

Track List: 1.Tyler 2.King 3.12 Bar 4.Burden Of Shame 5.Adella 6.I Think It's Going To Rain Today 7.25% 8.Food For Thought 9.Little By Little 10.Signing Off 11.Madam Medusa 12.Strange Fruit 13.Reefer Madness


Thanks to Cliff for another awesome submission, I will be here as long as you continue to send me this great stuff, no need to worry about a "3-day bender", fuck it, I have at least two of those a week....wish you could be here in the USA to help me celebrate my birthday Friday May 1, but the stuff you send is so great it's like you sent me a gift-wrapped present!


  1. See,Calif, here is good example of how valuable yourself and other submitters/teammembers are...i am only vaguely familiar with ub40, really significant that you point out that so much of their shit's great that you help the no reggae readers understand everything....your greatcommentary/criticsism has been one key to my continuing doing this, as long as there is stuff to be shared, pur partnership, along with others, will help to keep the share of great music flowing......thanks again for your tremendous contributions, I hope they
    they continue, let us as a team,together, makesharing to continue to share the great music of our lives.

  2. Hi Scott & Cliff,
    Thanks for the champion sounds.
    And to BigScott Happy Birthday wishes from the UK

  3. Thanks cliff and scott for more great reggae.the black roots album is a classic.its an album thats always gets a lot of plays top class stuff.i agree what u say about ub40.the first few albums where ok but after that they went to pop for me.i have the second black root album around somewhere but not as good as the first.thats the one all lovers of music shoud hear.thanks again

  4. Just watched Reggae in a Babylon about the UK reggae scene. Dug it! Thanks for the tunes.